Outdoor Boot Camp is Back!

Outdoor Boot Camp is Back!

Registration ends September 24. New sessions start October 1! 

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EJGH Awarded Four Star Rating

EJGH Awarded Four Star Rating

For the third consecutive time, CMS awarded us with 4-Stars!

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12th Annual Up on The Roof: 10/05/2018

12th Annual Up on The Roof: 10/05/2018

Featuring music by Groovy 7! Tickets on sale now.

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New Safe Sitter Classes Now Available

New Safe Sitter Classes Now Available

The Nationally-Recognized Program is once again offering 2-day courses.

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Why are we #1?

Why are we #1?

Let's talk about it! Our new campaign focuses on why we are at the top.

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Smoking Cessation

Smoking Cessation

Quit Smoking. Start Healing. All for Free.

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Introducing: Therapeutic Yoga at EJGH

Introducing: Therapeutic Yoga at EJGH

Come experience the many physical benefits of our new class at the Wellness Center! 

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Make the Most of Your Meals in 2018

Make the Most of Your Meals in 2018

Join EJGH's registered Nutritionist for healthy cooking demo's each month this year! 

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Number 1 in Louisiana, Number 10 in America

Number 1 in Louisiana, Number 10 in America

Proud of our accolades. More proud to be the choice of care for you and yours. 

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Now Open: EJGH Urgent Care!

Now Open: EJGH Urgent Care!

Visit us at our new location in Kenner. 

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Free Child Safety Seat Fittings at EJGH

Free Child Safety Seat Fittings at EJGH

Stop by the Wellness Center Parking Lot on the 3rd Thursday of every month. 

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News And Events

Latest News

Volunteer of the Month: August 2018

Jerry Ricks

It has only taken 2 years for Jerry Ricks to become the face of the EJGH pharmacy. His ever-smiling presence, attention to detail and willingness to always go the extra mile, (which to Jerry always just seems to be the right thing to do), has endeared him to the entire pharmacy staff but also those who deal with that department. Thank you Jerry for all you do to help make EJGH a truly great hospital.

Upcoming Events

Outpatients with low back pain who had an MRI without trying recommended treatments first, such as physical therapy

Description of Measure

An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a test that uses a powerful magnetic field and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of the body (bones, organs, and other body parts). Although MRI scans can be helpful for diagnosing low back pain, they can also be used too much. Low back pain can improve or go away within six weeks and an MRI may not be needed.

Why is this Important?

Standards of care say that most patients with low back pain should start with treatment such as physical therapy or chiropractic care, and have an MRI only if the treatment doesn’t help.

Finding out whether treatment helps or not before having an MRI can be a safe and effective way to avoid unnecessary stress, risk, or cost of doing an MRI.

  •  For patients with certain conditions, getting an MRI right away is appropriate care. Patients with these conditions are not included in this measure.
  • If you have low back pain, you, your doctor, and the medical imaging facility staff can talk about the best time to do an MRI if you need one.
  • Since MRIs use magnets rather than x-rays, there is no radiation risk. However, because the magnets attract some kinds of metal, it’s important for the technician to know if there are any metal objects or implants inside your body, such as pacemakers, artificial joints, screws, stents, plates, or staples. Metal objects can pose serious risk to you during the MRI and interfere with the test.
  • For some MRIs, a substance called “contrast” is injected before the test to make parts of the body stand out more clearly on the images. Risks of contrast include possible harm to the kidneys or allergic reactions. Contrast shouldn’t be used if it isn’t needed.
  • Having the test can be stressful for some people. Patients must hold still for about 15 to 45 minutes while lying on a table that moves inside a large scanning machine. While images are being taken, the machine makes loud noises.
Click image for larger chart.

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All descriptions and data sources are reported from Hospital Compare.

Data reported are based on discharges from Third Quarter 2012 through Second Quarter 2013

Outpatients who had a follow-up mammogram, ultrasound, or MRI of the breast within 45 days after a screening mammogram

Description of Measure

A screening mammogram is an x-ray of the breast to check for possible breast cancer before it can be detected by women or health care professionals.

Why is this Important?

Although mammography is a good test, it is not perfect. Some women who do not have breast cancer will have an abnormal mammogram (even though they are cancer free) and some women with breast cancer will have a normal screening mammogram (their cancer is missed).

Some women may be asked to come back for follow-up testing if there are signs of possible breast cancer. A follow-up visit usually means having more tests (mammograms, an ultrasound, or both). The numbers of women asked to follow-up varies widely among mammography facilities in the United States.

There are many reasons for differences in follow-up rates including poor technique (blurry X-rays that need to be repeated), a lack of skill or experience interpreting the screening mammograms, medical history of the woman undergoing screening, and whether a woman is being screened for the first time, or has previously undergone mammography screening.

The follow-up rates reported here for mammography facilities include follow-up exams performed on the same day as screening mammograms.

Medical evidence suggests that there may be a problem if a facility has either a very low or very high rate of follow-ups.

  • Although, values for a very low follow-up rate have not been established, a follow-up rate near zero may indicate a facility that misses signs of cancer. Follow up rates around 9% are typical.
  • Research has established that a follow-up rate above 14 percent is not appropriate and may indicate a facility doing unnecessary follow-up.

If you have a screening mammogram and you are called back for additional testing, ask your doctor why and what this additional testing means in your case for how he or she makes an accurate diagnosis.

Click image for larger chart.

Thumbnail image

All descriptions and data sources are reported from Hospital Compare.

Data reported are based on discharges from Third Quarter 2012 through Second Quarter 2013