Cardiology

A Change of Heart: Your Guide to Better Cardiac Health

 Cardiology Infographic - East Jefferson General Hospital

Copy and paste the code in the area below to place "A Change of Heart: Your Guide to Better Cardiac Health" image on your site for free.

No Iframes

 

The Scope of Heart Disease

Nearly half of all Americans are affected by at least one of the three key risk factors for heart disease: smoking, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. These risk factors contribute to 735,000 heart attacks annually in the United States. In fact, every 34 seconds, someone in the US suffers a heart attack—525,000 for the first time and 210,000 repeat victims. The financial ramifications of these conditions cannot be overlooked; the annual cost of heart disease in the United States is approximately $320.1 billion, which accounts for both direct and indirect costs, including medical expenses and lost productivity.

Globally, heart disease results in 17.3 million deaths per year, and women are particularly at risk: although it is commonly thought of as a man’s disease, heart disease is the number one cause of death in women around the world. Four in five women are unaware that heart disease is their greatest health threat, and 90 percent of women have one or more risk factors for developing heart disease.

Know the Symptoms

Despite the prevalence of heart attacks in the United States, only 27 percent of Americans are aware of the symptoms of this threat. Similarly, few Americans are aware of the symptoms of atrial fibrillation, an abnormal heartbeat that increases the risk of heart failure and stroke. While the symptoms of these cardiac conditions may not always be evident, they are important to recognize; knowing these signs can save a life.

Heart attack symptoms:

  • Chest pressure or discomfort
  • Discomfort in one or both arms
  • Back, neck, jaw, or stomach discomfort
  • Shortness of breath
  • Lightheadedness
  • Nausea

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) symptoms:

  • Fatigue or dizziness
  • Rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • Fluttering or thumping feeling in the chest
  • Shortness of breath
  • Anxiety or confusion
  • Sweating
  • Chest pain or pressure

 

First Aid

If you think someone is having a heart attack or suffers from atrial fibrillation…

  • Sit the person down
  • Keep them calm
  • Loosen tight clothing
  • Help them take medication for known heart conditions
  • DO NOT give the person oral medications unless prescribed
  • DO NOT wait to see if symptoms disappear - call 911 immediately

 

Prevention

Leading a healthy lifestyle can greatly reduce your risk of heart disease. Cardiologists have concluded that eating healthy, managing your blood pressure, maintaining a healthy weight, committing to regular exercise, reducing your blood sugar, and quitting smoking are the best prevention methods. In fact, only one year after quitting smoking, an individual’s risk associated with smoking is cut in half.

Unfortunately, less than one percent of US adults meet the American Heart Association's guidelines for an ideal healthy diet. For a well-rounded, heart-healthy diet, incorporate fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, poultry, fish, and nuts while limiting red meat, sodium, and sugary foods and beverages. Avoid high cholesterol by reducing saturated fats to no more than five to six percent of total calories consumed in a day (13 grams for a 2,000-calorie diet). In addition to careful health and dietary monitoring, The American Heart Association recommends at least 2.5 hours of moderate physical activity per week, which can reduce your risk of coronary heart disease by up to 30 percent.

Having a healthy diet and maintaining a healthy weight can help you manage your blood pressure and blood sugar, which can consequently lower your risk of developing heart disease. Furthermore, the risks are higher for those who don’t maintain a healthy body weight: a body mass index (BMI) over 25 is linked to an increased risk for heart disease. With nearly 70 percent of US adults classified as either overweight or obese, cardiologists consider it essential to educate patients about the benefits of healthy eating. Additional risk factors include diabetes, which puts adults four times more at risk for heart disease, and high blood pressure, a condition from which one in three Americans suffers. Many adults don’t know they have high blood pressure, so patients are encouraged to have theirs checked by a doctor.

Contact your cardiologist for more information about heart health and the specifics of your own cardiac health. To find a cardiologist who fits your health and insurance needs, call HealthFinder at 504-456-5000.

Sources:

         

 

A Change of Heart: Your Guide to Better Cardiac Health

 Cardiology Infographic - East Jefferson General Hospital

Copy and paste the code in the area below to place "A Change of Heart: Your Guide to Better Cardiac Health" image on your site for free.

 

The Scope of Heart Disease

Nearly half of all Americans are affected by at least one of the three key risk factors for heart disease: smoking, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. These risk factors contribute to 735,000 heart attacks annually in the United States. In fact, every 34 seconds, someone in the US suffers a heart attack—525,000 for the first time and 210,000 repeat victims. The financial ramifications of these conditions cannot be overlooked; the annual cost of heart disease in the United States is approximately $320.1 billion, which accounts for both direct and indirect costs, including medical expenses and lost productivity.

Globally, heart disease results in 17.3 million deaths per year, and women are particularly at risk: although it is commonly thought of as a man’s disease, heart disease is the number one cause of death in women around the world. Four in five women are unaware that heart disease is their greatest health threat, and 90 percent of women have one or more risk factors for developing heart disease.

Know the Symptoms

Despite the prevalence of heart attacks in the United States, only 27 percent of Americans are aware of the symptoms of this threat. Similarly, few Americans are aware of the symptoms of atrial fibrillation, an abnormal heartbeat that increases the risk of heart failure and stroke. While the symptoms of these cardiac conditions may not always be evident, they are important to recognize; knowing these signs can save a life.

Heart attack symptoms:

  • Chest pressure or discomfort
  • Discomfort in one or both arms
  • Back, neck, jaw, or stomach discomfort
  • Shortness of breath
  • Lightheadedness
  • Nausea

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) symptoms:

  • Fatigue or dizziness
  • Rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • Fluttering or thumping feeling in the chest
  • Shortness of breath
  • Anxiety or confusion
  • Sweating
  • Chest pain or pressure

First Aid

If you think someone is having a heart attack or suffers from atrial fibrillation…

  • Sit the person down
  • Keep them calm
  • Loosen tight clothing
  • Help them take medication for known heart conditions
  • DO NOT give the person oral medications unless prescribed
  • DO NOT wait to see if symptoms disappear - call 911 immediately

Prevention

Leading a healthy lifestyle can greatly reduce your risk of heart disease. Cardiologists have concluded that eating healthy, managing your blood pressure, maintaining a healthy weight, committing to regular exercise, reducing your blood sugar, and quitting smoking are the best prevention methods. In fact, only one year after quitting smoking, an individual’s risk associated with smoking is cut in half.

Unfortunately, less than one percent of US adults meet the American Heart Association's guidelines for an ideal healthy diet. For a well-rounded, heart-healthy diet, incorporate fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, poultry, fish, and nuts while limiting red meat, sodium, and sugary foods and beverages. Avoid high cholesterol by reducing saturated fats to no more than five to six percent of total calories consumed in a day (13 grams for a 2,000-calorie diet). In addition to careful health and dietary monitoring, The American Heart Association recommends at least 2.5 hours of moderate physical activity per week, which can reduce your risk of coronary heart disease by up to 30 percent.

Having a healthy diet and maintaining a healthy weight can help you manage your blood pressure and blood sugar, which can consequently lower your risk of developing heart disease. Furthermore, the risks are higher for those who don’t maintain a healthy body weight: a body mass index (BMI) over 25 is linked to an increased risk for heart disease. With nearly 70 percent of US adults classified as either overweight or obese, cardiologists consider it essential to educate patients about the benefits of healthy eating. Additional risk factors include diabetes, which puts adults four times more at risk for heart disease, and high blood pressure, a condition from which one in three Americans suffers. Many adults don’t know they have high blood pressure, so patients are encouraged to have theirs checked by a doctor.

Contact your cardiologist for more information about heart health and the specifics of your own cardiac health. To find a cardiologist who fits your health and insurance needs, call HealthFinder at 504-456-5000.

Sources:

Arctic Front® Cardiac CryoAblation Catheter is the world’s first cryoballoon indicated for the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). It provides a straightforward and efficient approach to pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). It has a low complication risk and a proven efficacy in eliminating atrial fibrillation (AF). Over 15,000 patients in more than 200 centers worldwide have been treated with the Arctic Front.

  How Arctic Front Works(2:35)

Overview

An Efficient Approach to PVI

The Arctic Front cryoballoon provides a straightforward and efficient approach for isolating the pulmonary veins in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. It is the first cryoballoon indicated for the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

  • Arctic Front creates circumferential lesions1, using 2-3 applications per vein to achieve PVI2
  • Arctic Front does not require 3D mapping, reducing procedural complexity
  • Short, predictable procedure times allow you to treat more patients3

A Proven Approach to PVI

The North American Sustained Treatment of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (STOP AF) trial, a 26-center randomized, controlled study, confirmed the safety and efficacy of Arctic Front. 69.9% of patients achieved treatment success at 12 months.

Benefits of Cryoablation

The Arctic Front system uses cryo energy which offers a number of unique safety features:

  • Cryoadhesion improves contact and stability, minimizing the amount of fluoro used
  • Preserves the extracellular matrix and endothelial integrity1
  • Decreases risk of thrombus formation1
  • Demonstrates well demarcated lesions1

A Safe Approach to PVI

  • Clinical studies report no incidence of atrial-esophageal fistulas or perforation2,4
  • Low reported occurrence of left atrial tachycardia post procedure4
  • Cryoablation procedure event rate in the STOP AF pivotal study was a low 3.1%2

Important Safety Information

Catheter ablation should only be conducted in a fully equipped electrophysiology laboratory by trained physicians.

Phrenic Nerve Injury (PNI) can be minimized by positioning Arctic Front as antral as possible and vigilantly monitoring the phrenic nerve with pacing during cryotherapy delivery. Stop ablation immediately if evidence of phrenic nerve impairment is observed.

In most cases, including STOP AF, PNI with cryotherapy is a transient complication. PV stenosis can be minimized by not positioning Arctic Front within the tubular portion of the pulmonary vein. Do not inflate the balloon while the catheter is positioned inside the pulmonary vein. Always inflate the balloon in the atrium and then position at the pulmonary vein ostia.

Potential complications, while infrequent, can occur during catheter ablation. Please review the device manual for detailed information regarding contraindications, warnings, precautions, and potential complications.


References

1. Sarabanda AV, Bunch TJ, Johnson SB, et al. Efficacy and safety of circumferential pulmonary vein isolation using a novel cryothermal balloon ablation system. J Am Coll Cardiol. November 15, 2005;46(10):1902-1912.

2. Medtronic Inc., Arctic Front Cardiac CryoAblation Catheter clinical reports, in support of FDA premarket approval.

3. Kojodjojo P, O'Neill MD, Lim PB, et al. Pulmonary venous isolation by antral ablation with a large cryoballoon for treatment of paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation: medium-term outcomes and non-randomised comparison with pulmonary venous isolation by radiofrequency ablation. Heart. September 2010;96(17):1379-1384.

4. Van Belle Y, Janse P, Theuns D, Szili-Torok T, Jordaens L. One year follow-up after cryoballoon isolation of the pulmonary veins in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Europace. November 2008:10(11):1271-1276.

How Arctic Front Works

Arctic Front cryoballoon creates circumferential lesions, isolating each pulmonary vein with minimal energy applications, delivering consistent and repeatable results. Arctic Front provides physicians a straightforward three-step approach for PVI.

 How Arctic Front Works (2:35)


Straightforward 3-Step Procedure


Step 1: Wire targeted vein
Arctic Front is deployed in the left atrium and the guidewire is inserted into the target vein.


Step 2: Inflate and Position
The Arctic Front is inflated in the atrium before being advanced toward the wired vein. The balloon is then positioned at the antrum of the pulmonary vein.


Step 3: Occlude and Ablate
Contrast dye is then injected through the guide-wire lumen to assess vein occlusion via fluoroscopy. The cryoballoon ablates where the balloon is in contact with the tissue. Arctic Front's anatomical shape and large surface area creates circumferential lesions with minimal energy applications. On average, PVI is typically achieved after two to three, 4-minute applications of energy per vein.  A circular mapping catheter is then used to confirm pulmonary vein isolation.

Specifications

Arctic Front cryoballoon is supplied sterile and packaged individually. It is a single-use device.

Size

Inflated balloon diameter: 23 mm or 28 mm

Catheter size, outer diameter shaft: 10.5 Fr

Total length: 140 cm

Usable length: 102 cm

Distal tip length: 10 mm

Compatibility

Recommended introducer sheath: FlexCath® Steerable Sheath, 12 Fr

Guide wire: 0.035" maximum

Deflection and Reach

Bidirectional, 45°

Materials

Tip and shaft: Biocompatible copolymer (Pebax®) with barium sulfate blend (BaSO4)

Outer balloon: Polyurethane

There is a beat that sustains us all, our hearts provide a natural rhythm of life that we often take for granted until that rhythm is interrupted. At EJGH we have teams of cardiologists, cardiovascular surgeons, electrophysiologists, cardiac rehab therapists, cardiology techs, nurses, nutritionists, fitness experts and professionals who never take the beating heart for granted. They are dedicated to helping you maintain the rhythm of your life.

Cardiology at EJGH

At East Jefferson General Hospital, we have one of the region's most accomplished cardiology divisions. Our staff of cardiologists carries credentials, accomplishments and reputations for excellence that are unsurpassed. Add to that the surgeons who work from the EJGH Institute of Heart and Vascular Medicine and the fact that two of the state's few electrophysiologists work here and you begin to see an array of talent that puts EJGH well ahead of the curve in comprehensive heart care. Our efforts in preventing and treating diseases of the heart have long been among the most advanced in the state but in the past several months, we have taken a stand as an innovator on both the national and international stages.

Breakthroughs at EJGH

In recent months, Dr. James McKinnie, who practices at EJGH, has developed CryoCath, a new procedure for those with Atrial-Fibrillation or irregular heartbeat. In the past, those with A-Fib would be treated with medication. Those medicines were effective in roughly half the cases and they came with sometimes significant side effects. With CryoCath, Dr. McKinnie has presented not a treatment, but a true remedy. Dr. Stanley Bleich, a Cardiologist and Chair of the EJGH Cardiology Board described the change in very bold terms, "In the past, we've been able to treat a-fib but this procedure is revolutionary in the sense that we can eradicate this condition, not just treat it." To read an article on CryoCath, click here.

Another breakthrough that occurred here at EJGH is the development of EKOS Catheter treatment for Pulmonary Embolisms by Dr. Tod Engelhardt. Dr. Engelhardt is a Cardiovascular-Thoracic Surgeon at EJGH. As such, he knew that patients sometimes died from the emboli because the clot busting drug, TPE, could not get to the clot fast enough through traditional intraveinous methods. In one desperate moment, Dr. Engelhardt used a special vibrating catheter that allowed him to maneuver directly to the embolism. Once there, he could introduce TPE right at the point it was needed. The clot medication worked almost immediately and literally saved the patient's life. Since then, Dr. Engelhardt's new procedure has been written about in medical journals, presented in medical meetings in Europe, Asia, South American and throughout North America. Most importantly, lives have been saved that would have previously been lost. To read more about this innovative procedure, click here.

Listen to Dr. Engelhardt's Interview with Delta

 

Dr. Michael Brothers is a partner of Dr. Engelhardt's. Over the years, he has established a national reputation as an innovative and skilled surgeon who is always seeking better ways to perform surgeries on the heart and lungs. His attempts to accomplish higher outcomes with smaller incisions and less peripheral damage to the patient has earned him the respect of other surgeons throughout the nation. Today, he stands at the forefront of innovation even working with Dr. McKinnie on developing new techniques that can ensure the safety of the patient.

Care Goes Beyond the Walls of our Hospital

Emergency Medical Services at EJGH or EMS, have long been recognized as one of the most professional, credentialed, and effective medical response and ambulance teams in the state. They are often the first line of care when you or someone you love is suffering a heart attack, stroke or cardiac event. Among the tools at their disposal is 12-lead field EKG. This allows our EMS to send, in real time, accurate readings of your heart functions back to physicians in the Emergency Department so those doctors can coordinate your care throughout your transit to the ER Door. Already, on numerous occasions, the seconds saved with this technique have saved lives.

EJGH is the only hospital in area to achieve this level for outstanding treatment of heart failure patients

The American Heart Association (AHA) has awarded East Jefferson General Hospital the Heart Failure Gold Performance Achievement Award, the highest award possible. The Heart Failure Award is part of the AHA's Get with the Guidelines Program and signifies that institutions receiving the award have met the aggressive goals set forth by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Get with the Guidelines is a quality improvement initiative that provides hospital staff with tools that follow proven, evidence-based guidelines and procedures in caring for heart failure patients to prevent future hospitalizations. The award also shows that East Jefferson has provided this high level of care for at least 24 consecutive months and that patient education and collaboration within the medical teams are a major focus.

"This is an important award for our patients and our community," says cardiologist and EJGH Heart Failure Physician Champion Dr. Fortune Dugan. "We met the goals because of the great work being done here at every level. This validates the high level of care we are giving to our patients, and we are extremely proud to be recognized with this prestigious honor."

Find the Right Doctor

Please call HealthFinder at (504) 503-5000 to find the right doctor for you. Representatives are available from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

For emergencies, please call 911 or proceed to the nearest emergency room.

 

Support Groups

Defibrillator Support Group

Meets on the 3rd Thursday of every other month. Call (504) 454-4145 for dates and location.

A Fib Support Group

Meets on the 1st Wednesday of every other month. Call (504) 456-5000 for dates and location.

Click here to view lectures.